Mastering the Art of Storytelling

I often say that writing grants isn’t rocket science. It’s a skill. Therefore, it’s something that most people can learn.

In my opinion, and in my experience, it all boils down to your ability to tell a story.

So often people get caught up in the logistics and the semantics of the grant announcement that they forget what the process is all about. You’re trying to win the heart of the funder by mesmerizing them with your story. You need to give them a compelling reason to invest in your program and your organization.

When I was in high school there was a defining moment that made me a great writer.  My English literature teacher assigned us to write a report on Macbeth. When I got my paper back I was disappointed with my grade. When I asked her to explain to me what I did wrong she mentioned several key things I left out of the story. To which my response was, “you know that already. You read the story.”

Her response was my aha moment and forever changed me as a writer.  She said, “you have to write as though I don’t know the story.”

That’s the exact same thing you have to remember when you’re writing a grant.  The reviewer of your grant doesn’t know your story. They can’t look it up on Google. So, if you want them to know the great things about your program you have to tell them.

Here are 3 key things you can do to master the art of storytelling.

1. Identify the story you want to tell. There maybe a lot your organization is doing, but what is that one story you want to tell and have the ability to tell effectively. Even in the midst of everything you’re doing there should be a central storyline at the core.

For example, Habitat for Humanity (HFH) is a nonprofit organization that builds homes for low-income families. The story isn’t that it builds houses, it’s the impact it’s having on families and communities around the world.

2. Pick three key points you want to make about that story. Provide supporting statements that make the point. These should be concrete examples.

Using the same example of HFH, an option is to highlight the before and after of a family that was the beneficiary of a new home. What was their life like before and how is it different now? Beyond the obvious of now they have a house whereas they didn’t before. You have to go deeper  by revealing something less obvious, but extremely impactful.

3. Demonstrate why your story matters to the donor. Why should they give to your organization? Ideally, your story and your work should align with the priorities and values of the donor you’re soliciting for help.  Also, be sure to demonstrate the direct impact of their donation by identifying the actual problem it will resolve.

If you can incorporate these three strategies you will significantly improve your ability to tell your story and to write successful grant proposals.

If you want to learn more ways to tell your story, I’m offering a course on this subject in October. I’d love to have you join us.

Until next time…

Peace & Blessings!